Mamma's School

Home Education Adventure

Tag: outdoor play (Page 1 of 24)

Hiking with Kids and Tips for Surviving It!

Hiking with kids is exhausting, but mainly in the run up to it. Once you get out there with your little tribe, it is so worth all the effort to get your family ready to hit the trails ūüôā I know only too well the effort it takes getting small people ready to go outside, especially during a Swedish winter.¬† I have a blog post dedicated to the whys and wherefores, joys and frustrations over at this link http://mammasschool.co.uk/parenting/we-are-going-out-in-quite-a-while/¬†Today I want to talk more about why it is so good for families to get out there and go hiking with kids, and offer some handy tips for making it more enjoyable.¬† In the future I will be writing more about how we prepare and the logistics of what we take.¬† First off, as the parent, you need to stay motivated and focus on the end goal of getting out there, knowing that everyone will be happier, have a great adventure together, and be immersed in nature.¬† To motivate everyone else through that door you need to be motivated!¬† I also try and let my trio experience a range of weather conditions (within reason!).¬† I am careful not to make hiking a sunny day only activity, as with the right clothing, fun can be had in most weathers.¬† Want to know about why it is so good hiking with kids and tips to make it great for everyone?¬† Read on……

Why Go Hiking with Kids?

  1.  They need to be in the great outdoors.  It is good for their development, self esteem, and makes them healthier.
  2. They need exposure to nature and wildlife.¬† Their enjoyment of nature will help protect it in the future.¬† If they have experienced it and been immersed in it, they are more likely to want to nurture and conserve it in future…you are investing in nature’s future as well as your child’s.
  3. They are learning new skills…they climb, they run, they negotiate together, they learn to take risks more and manage those risks, as well as learning skills such as looking after themselves in the great outdoors, some basic survival skills, using a compass, and using a map.
  4. They are exercising!¬† Need I say more ūüôā
  5. Out on a hike, everyone can truly unplug, leave screens and technology behind, forget about jobs in the home, and it gives an opportunity to reconnect together as a family.
  6. Hiking is known to be a stress buster, therefore increasing happiness and decreasing stress.

Tips to Survive Hiking with Kids.

  1.  Make sure you are carrying secret, emergency bribes.  Tired little legs sometimes need encouragement of the sweet variety.  It boosts morale, provides a little energy boost and you are good to go a little further.  Some days you may not need them, but keep them with you at all times!
  2. Take some props.¬† Our favourites are compasses, torches (winter), binoculars, bug pots, and cameras.¬† This in turn can lead to little tasks to help them along the trail’s way….we also like looking for tracks, especially in the winter snow.
  3. Plan the hike a little around food and play.¬† When I take my three trolls out, we hike a while, then I plan at least an hour, more like a 1.5-2 hour stop, then hike a little more.¬† During that stop they play and I cook.¬† They climb, adventure, explore, paddle or anything else that takes their fancy.¬† I get a fire going and we all get hot morale boosting food.¬† They will tackle the second stage of the hike with renewed enthusiasm even though they’ve still been expending energy throughout the break.
  4. Pitch your hike at their level…the distance to be covered, the weather conditions, the terrain.¬† However, feel free to stretch them a little bit.¬† Just get the balance right.
  5. Have little games up your sleeve to play….I don’t mean card or board games…I mean little games using nature while you are walking.¬† Or suggest a small stop to pick berries that can then be munched on route.
  6. Allow time, lots of it, and more again.¬† There is nothing worse than trying to hurry children along, they naturally get slower doing that.¬† They need to go at their pace, and not just their walking pace.¬† Their pace of life….looking, experiencing, collecting things all along the way.
  7. Take lots of food, and lots of water to make sure you are not caught short with the essentials.¬† These 2 things can alter a child’s mood substantially when the going gets tiring!

If you like the idea of hiking with your children and as a family, there are lots of hiking websites out there for inspiration and advice.¬† I like looking at¬†https://highpeakshiking.com¬†it’s a great site for the hiking community to share experiences, tips, and inspiration ūüôā¬† I enjoy just browsing through and getting ideas or being a little nosy!¬† So go on, get planning your adventure!

Hiking with Kids and tips for surviving it, hiking children, outdoors, nature, children outdoors, www.mammasschool.co.uk

 

Our Autumn Bucket List – Getting Cosy In Autumn

I love all the seasons, and I am not sure I favour one more than the others.¬† However, when the seasons start changing and moving on, I am always ready for a change and love what the next one might bring – especially now that we live somewhere that has four distinct seasons!¬† So, now that autumn is well and truly here, we have spent the afternoon leaf rubbing in our nature journals as the background decor to our autumn bucket list – a list of everything that we would like to do during this season.¬† We’ve then made one giant list incorporating everyone’s little lists, so we can tick them off as we go.

Our Autumn bucket list ended up consisting of 34 things, and here they are:

1. Have a leaf fight

2. Catch falling leaves

3. Paint leaves

4. Kick leaves

5. Play with toys by the fire

6. Have a proper hot chocolate – with chocolate spoons, cream, and marshmallows

7. Eat warm kanelbullar (cinnamon buns)

8. Look for conkers

9. Roast pumpkin seeds

10. Roast chestnuts

11. Do nature art with leaves

12. Have a cosy afternoon in the library

13. Enjoy a season-scented bubble bath

14. Enjoy a season-scented candle

15. Sunset picnic

16. Sunrise picnic

17. Bake with apples

18. Bake with ginger

19. Carve a pumpkin

20. Count the leaf colours on a walk

21. Jump in leaves

22. Light indoor fires

23. Cosy on the sofa with stories and blankets

24. Watch a cosy autumn movie

25. Have the whole family toast marshmallows

26. Make a leaf caterpillar

27. Throw leaves

28. Autumn Camping

29. Autumn walk

30. Collect leaves

31. Make blackberry jam

32. Apple experiment

33. Sloeberry experiment

You may well be intrigued by a few of the things on the bucket list…I am!¬† But I guess that’s what you get when you ask two 5 year olds, one 9 year old, and a 41 year old what they would like to do this autumn ūüôā

Our autumn bucket list, autumn, things to do in autumn, cosy autumn, www.mammasschool.co.uk

 

Nature Art – Air Dry Clay Figures

Today was a gorgeous warm (ish), but sunny autumnal day, so we decided to chill out in the garden doing some nature art.  We had some air dry clay left over from a previous crafting project, so we decided to use that up and do something with it, before it completely air dried itself out in the crafting drawers!  Nature clay figures it was to be.

The only supplies you need are air dry clay and things from around the garden.  I sent my trio off to collect various items.  They headed back with leaves, grass, twigs, sticks, sloe berries, various red berries, and anything else they could lay their hands on.  I was intrigued to see twin 2 really involved in this activity, as in the past he has not been so keen.  He and our little lady spent a good hour modelling their figures, while twin 1 bashed his lump into a pancake shape, and then headed off to cause mischief while the rest of us were distracted!!!

Any art and craft activity is good for their little brains (and I find it quite restorative too!).  It helps their mental, social, and emotional development.  Whatever they have chosen to do will usually involve honing their fine motor skills.  They use their imaginations to create with their resources, and when they enjoy and like what they have made, it in turn increases their self confidence.

Some of the best supplies are outdoors in nature (and they are free too).¬† Doing nature art gets everyone outside in the fresh air.¬† Their attention to detail within nature is increased as they look and discuss what they are using, which can then lead onto other discussions about its role in nature, and open a whole new learning topic.¬† Nature’s supplies are often a lot more interesting with regard to colour, smell, and texture too, making it more fun.

The finished nature art products we ended up with from today’s session were 2 hedgehogs, a snowman, and a scary rabbit….oh, and a flat pancake thingy!!

Nature art, nature craft, art and craft, outdoors art, outdoors craft, www.mammasschool.co,.uk nature art, nature craft, outdoor art, outdoor craft, art and craft, www.mammasschool.co.uk

 

Scout Bomb – A Tasty Scouting Treat

A few weeks ago my little lady returned from her day away on her sj√∂scout island bursting with lots of enthusiasm over the day, but mainly for the food that they had prepared and eaten. In particular, a dish called the “scout bomb”.¬† She had been dying to cook this for us all on the fire, so this week I made sure we had all the ingredients, and on our weekly fire pit meal she prepared, she cooked, and she did a great job…..the fact that she cooked a meal all three children ate without a complaint is something I very rarely achieve!

Ingredients:

Potatoes (diced, and I worked on 2  small potatoes per person).

A leek.

Cream cheese.

A knob of butter per person.

A huge sausage (excuse the supermarket photo of said sausage, but I forgot to include it in the proper photo and by the time I remembered it was in our tummies!!).

Instructions:

Dice the potato and sausage.

Peel off a leek leaf and make into a rectangle to hold a portion (it’s your plate).

Place the mixed up diced potato and sausage onto the leek leaf.

On top of the potato and sausage place the knob of butter and a few teaspoons of cream cheese.

Wrap the whole bundle in tin foil….and there is your scout bomb ready to cook.

To cook your scout bomb place it onto the fire for at least 15 mins.¬† Once that is finished, carefully lift it off onto a plate and unwrap the scout bomb.¬† The leek “plate” will have infused the rest of the meal with flavour, and the butter and cream cheese melted to coat the meal in a delicious sauce.

You can eat your scout bomb straight off the leaf, but my three are quite adverse to the known presence of leek in their meals (even though it was the choice of one of them to cook with it!), so we scraped it all off onto a plate….it was very delicious, and very welcome on a very wet day!

Scout bomb, scout, campfire food, outdoor cooking, scout camp, scout food www.mammasschool.co.uk

 

 

Sticks Are The Best Toys Ever!

Sticks are great toys….they are free, abundantly available in the outdoors, and have many play possibilities and functions. ¬†Plus, children seem drawn to them like magnets ūüôā ¬†Anyone that follows us on Instagram (@mammasschool) will know that my trio are rarely seen without a bundle of sticks, or trying to drag what is more like a tree trunk along on a hike.

When playing with sticks there is an added benefit, in that they are generally to be found in the outdoors, which means they lend themselves to naturally be played with in the great outdoors.  I have many posts about the benefits of outdoor play.  They can be found in the following links:

http://mammasschool.co.uk/parenting/balanced-barefoot-importance-unrestricted-outdoor-play/

http://mammasschool.co.uk/parenting/outdoor-play-children-natures-sanity/

http://mammasschool.co.uk/parenting/healing-nature-relying-beach-work-magic/

http://mammasschool.co.uk/outdoor-adventures/wild-camping-children-sweden/

In today’s post I want to chat a little about why sticks are so important and a method of play for children.

Sticks are a “loose part” toy. ¬†That means that they have no predetermined role. ¬†It is all down to the child’s imagination and creativity as to what they become, or are used for. ¬†This is important for growth and development. ¬†They can build and construct with them, role play with them, create art with them, and even use them as writing tools. ¬†They also come in lots of shapes, sizes, colours, and textures, adding to the fun. ¬†Many parents shy away from letting children play with sticks on safety grounds. ¬†We have 3 main rules; the sticks do not touch people, you don’t hit anything with them, and lastly (but important for my sanity), they stay outdoors! ¬†Every stick they find is always “the best ever” and I’d have a house full without this rule. ¬† So, with these three little rules in place, a lot of fun can be had. ¬†They may still need a little help drawing the line if play gets a little exuberant, but instead of teaching children that nature is dangerous, we are teaching them it is fun to play in, and then they will have more of a desire to protect it as they are growing up. ¬†They are being able to integrate with nature more.

There are lots of other benefits to playing with sticks too:

It teaches the children personal space and awareness.

It allows them to build strength and muscle (some of them are quite heavy that they shift around).

It allows them to get dirty and “hands on” with nature, helping to build their immunity (a discussion for another day!).

They are allowed to explore their own environment and work out what takes on which role.

It increases stimulation and awareness for the child.

They are using both large and small motor skills.

And of course, they are doing a lot of physical activity when playing with them…all very healthy.

 

So, next time you are headed outdoors with the little people, embrace the stick play ūüôā I find it hard to not keep saying things like “be careful”, or “do you really need to carry that?”, but I try very hard and leave them to it, and generally it all works out OK. ¬†They’ve had a lot of fun, they’ve learnt a lot through play, and I am more relaxed because there have been less arguments as we’ve all been outdoors (even if I was tripping over someone’s log being dragged on the hike!!).

 

sticks, play with sticks, stick toys, outdoor play, nature play, www.mammasschool.co.uk

 

Wild Camping with Children in Sweden.

Wild camping….with three little people….I think Dadda might have thought I was a bit daft, but he agreed we should try so we did! ¬†Here in Sweden, we have this fantastic thing called “allemansr√§tten”: ¬†this is the right of public access to roam freely almost anywhere in the countryside. ¬†There are a few responsibilities that come with this; you take care of nature and wildlife, respect landowners and others enjoying the countryside, respect the land and leave no trace you have been there, don’t disturb and don’t destroy.

I had really wanted to get the children away for wild camping, and with the summer now slipping away from us fast, we felt it was now or never for this year.  I had taken them away for 2 nights on my own somewhere over the summer holidays, but it was on a campsite.  It suited our needs well, especially as I was on my own with them, but it was noisy, cramped, and expensive!!  I wanted a closer experience to nature for them, and a more basic, less commercialised one as well.  Where else can you play in trees and swim in freezing sea, all before breakfast?!

I have written a lot in the past about the benefits of the great outdoors and nature play.  You can take a peek at the following posts to go into those in more depth;

http://mammasschool.co.uk/parenting/outdoor-play-children-natures-sanity/

http://mammasschool.co.uk/parenting/take-a-risk-explore-inside-a-tree/

http://mammasschool.co.uk/parenting/balanced-barefoot-importance-unrestricted-outdoor-play/

There were a lot of those reasons involved in our decision to get our children out for a night of wild camping. ¬†Being outdoors and in nature, supports all forms of development, there is more adventure to be had, there are more challenges (and mine up the ante with these by competing, for example who can climb the highest in the tree), and there is more creativity at work. ¬†They love to explore and there is much more to explore in the outdoors, teaching them to adapt to their environment and take risks. ¬†It increases their teamwork as well as their confidence, both very evident in how they helped and persuaded each other during little excursions into the woods during both the daylight and the dark, while we cooked and cleared away. ¬†They taught each other little things too. ¬†However, our decision to take them wild camping was not just about the children. ¬†It is also about looking after nature and there are benefits to us grown ups too. ¬†Our children will not grow up wanting to protect, respect, and look after nature unless they have experienced it, spent a lot of time immersed in it, and been allowed to enjoy it. ¬†This will increase their desire to conserve it. ¬†Also, while I will be the first to raise my hand and say any camping is hard work for the grown ups, before you even make it wild, we too benefit from being outdoors and in nature. ¬†We are getting our fresh air and vitamin D and N, our moods are better (although I have to say the weather does have the potential to alter this!), and our blood pressure¬†should¬†ūüėČ be lower!

We headed off on our wild camping trip to a place west of us called G√∂. ¬†It’s a delightful little peninsula, and whilst here in Sweden you don’t have to go far from any car park to be in the middle of nature and away from people. Plus it was really accessible for us with three small children, and I knew it would be relatively easy to pitch our tent. ¬†We were on our own surrounded by beautiful nature, and it was very peaceful too. ¬†The children learnt a lot of new things as well on this trip. ¬†They helped with the tent pitching, the fire building and lighting, how to toilet, cooking, we star gazed which initiated a whole torrent of questions, and during the night a lost young deer could be heard calling for its mother. ¬†They learnt a lot about looking after themselves, from the importance of insect repellent, to getting over the confusion about sleeping in their clothes, and how to not traipse all the sand and dirt into the sleeping areas. ¬†We watched the sun set, before we laid on our backs and watched the stars come out. ¬†Then in the morning, we had a very freezing dip in the sea after they had been climbing trees!

So, after returning very tired (between them, their sleep talking was constant!), very smelly, and needing a decent loo, are we pleased we did this mini adventure? ¬†Too right we are. ¬†It was a break from the norm for everyone, and for that reason it has provided everyone with a very memorable experience. ¬†The children loved the increased freedom (although they enjoy quite a lot of freedom here in Sweden anyway, they were allowed to wonder into the woods and explore the cove on their own….we could hear them before you panic!). ¬†It was back to basics, with no distractions, bonding time together as a family and as siblings, and lots of fun had with nature play. ¬†I would definitely recommend this to any family (but as we did, go for the easier option of a dry period!!). ¬†Good luck and I really hope you’ll step out of your comfort zone (as we did) and give it a go. ¬†You’ll be seriously pooped but left wanting to do it again…..maybe in another year ūüôā

Wild camping, kids camping, children camping, nature, outdoors, sweden, camping, www.mammasschool.co.uk

Our First Summer in Sweden-The Blog Returns :-)

Good morning!!! ¬†So the loony trio have returned back to school in Sweden, full of smiles and giggles…..the little lady at the age of 9 heads into year 3, and her first proper start of the swedish school year, and the mini men start their f√∂rskola klass which is 5 mornings a week….I feel like I don’t whats hit me after nearly six years of 24/7 double trouble!

This dangerous few free hours every morning has allowed me to think, in which direction I wanted to head with my blog. ¬†I have come to the conclusion that it will return, but on very different terms. My terms, not the numbers game terms of “getting you blog out there”, and everything associated with that. ¬†Life here in Sweden, and our big move here to Sweden, was all about adopting their way of living, and their slower paced, more nature loving way of living. ¬†I felt my work on the blog was contradicting this and I was drifting away from the original reasons I started it, and I do love writing it when the reasons for doing so are right. ¬†The blog is supposed to be all about trying to inspire people to reach for your dreams, get outside in nature, and educating children outside the box. ¬†So, with that in mind, I will now be posting just twice a week, on a Tuesday and Thursday. ¬†However, over on instagram we are making full use of the insta stories function almost on a daily basis and doing daily “mini blogs” with our photos….so head over to¬†https://www.instagram.com/mammasschool/to follow us on our one big Swedish adventure and see what we get up to. ¬†The stories only stay on there for 24 hours. We will also still share our instagram photos over on the facebook page too, so you can follow there as well¬†https://www.facebook.com/Mammas-School-1078629212158924/

We’ve had an amazing 10 weeks of summer holidays here in Sweden, exploring our new home. ¬†We have camped, visited outdoor viking museums, had many boat trips around our archipelago (including one with a friend we have made on the island, in his own boat). ¬†We’ve hiked loads, eaten lots of smokey fire pit food, geocached, hidden our own geocache, made LOTS of various fruit wines (and food), been to our first music festival, taken a trip up the west coast, finally managed to stop the ice cream van (those that visited and live here will know what a challenge that is), I’ve repainted our cabin (a whole new lesson and steep learning curve in maintaining wooden living areas), grown, foraged, and picked lots of food, and celebrated midsummer’s in great style! ¬†We have been fortunate enough to see the coming and going of four sets of visitors too, and spent some really treasured times with these family and close friends. ¬†We hope they will return again. ¬†So, adieu until Tuesday, and I will leave you with “Our Summer in Photos”….enjoy ūüôā

Flower Pounding – Nature’s Art

flower pounding, nature's art, art with nature, outdoor art, flower art, www.mammasschool.co.ukFlower pounding is a very effective way of doing art with nature.  My trio love doing this because it so easy and very effective.  We also love seeing how our results change over the course of the four seasons.

 

 

 

 

So what supplies are required for flower pounding?

Very few?! ¬†Any shape or size of cotton based material…plain is better as your results will be more visible. ¬†You need to bear in mind that whatever you choose, the material needs to be large enough to place the flowers on one side and then fold in half. ¬†You then need to pick a good selection of flowers and leaves. ¬†When we pick our leaves for flower pounding we look for ones that would make good patterns. ¬†For example, bracken with their fronds are good, or something similar. ¬†With the flowers anything with a good solid colour will work well. ¬†Then you just need a hammer.

Now you are all set to go….

Place your material flat, and start laying your leaves and flowers onto one half of the material.  You can either do this randomly, or think about the end result you would like and put more thought it into it.  My trio are all about the colours and patterns at the moment, so lay them out randomly.  You then need to fold the other half of the material over the top so the foliage is covered by the material.

 

Now you tap, tap, tap very gently with your hammer. ¬†Too hard or fast and the hammer will shred the material. ¬†Make sure you are firm enough though to see the colour coming through the material. ¬†Go over all the edges of the leaves and flowers to get the best definition results. ¬†You also need to do this on a firm surface. ¬†As you can see we have chosen our garage floor, rather than the lawn (too squishy with all the moss!), or the decking (didn’t want hammer shaped dents all over it!!). ¬†Once you think you have finished, open the material up and brush off the “crumbs” of the foliage, and you will be left with a lovely colourful pattern. ¬†One of ours turned out very much like a butterfly but this was completely accidental!! ¬†Nevertheless the children were very happy it did ūüôā

 

 

 

Stenshuvuds National Park – A Biodiversity Gem

Stenshuvuds National Park, Sweden National Parks, Sweden www.mammasschool.co.ukStenshuvuds National Park is an area in southern Sweden that brings together many different natural environments within quite a small area. ¬†Stenshuvud is actually a hill located in a relatively flat area of Sweden, so the views from the top are magnificent. It faces the Baltic Sea. ¬†The Stenshuvuds National Park contains forest, meadows, open heath land, swamps, and beaches…you can’t get many more forms of environment in one area!! ¬†With the rich diverse environments, also comes a rich and diverse array of animal and plant life. ¬†Close to the top are the remains of a 5th or 6th century fortress (which we didn’t visit this time round).

We arrived at Stenshuvuds National Park with the aim of taking a nice afternoon hike in a loop, taking in as many of the different environments as possible.  We started out in the forest, with a boardwalk over the more swampy areas.  The children loved trying to balance along the edges, and being the first real warmish day of spring, we were able to ditch the hats and over trousers, and enjoy the freedom of just being in thick jumpers and coats!

Once we had emerged from the wooded area, there was an open slope down to the wide and open stretch of beautiful white sandy beach. ¬†This area of Sweden is known for amber washing up ashore, so we were on a treasure hunt immediately! ¬†The rocks and stones were so beautiful. ¬†Many different colours and patterns, and soon the children were collecting them and stowing half of Sweden away in their pockets. ¬†They had a lot of favourite ones, and there were some tough decisions to be made about which few could come home with us, after they had lugged them a good way along the beach! ¬†Unfortunately we didn’t manage to locate any amber, but we did enjoy the stunning beach, its views, and the windiest part of the walk. ¬†The boys loved racing the waves in and out, standing on the verge of the water and then running backwards before the next wave could soak their feet:-)

After the beach it was up through the heath land and admiring the views on the way up, as well as the few hardy flowers that had been brave and already opened. ¬†Then it was back into the forest again to head towards the car. ¬†It was so nice to finally feel we were out in spring sunshine and the walk had amazing views. ¬†A truly beautiful place, and as the park describes themselves “a biodiversity gem”.

 

Sandhammeren Beach – The Carribean in Sweden!

Sandhammeren beach lies down in southern Sweden in Sk√•ne, and is one of Sweden’s finest beaches. ¬†The long stretches of white sand there can rival any Caribbean beach. ¬†On our recent adventure into this part of Sweden, Sandhammeren beach was on our “to do” list, and we were not disappointed. ¬†The beach stretches for miles and miles and miles, the sand is white and soft, the sea is blue and clear (and cold in late April!), and there are¬†the most amazing sand dunes as the back drop to this fantastic landscape.

As As soon as we released the trio from the car they ran straight for the dunes, and were racing up and down them for ages, giving Dadda and I ample time to take in the gorgeous view and use a leisurely pace to head towards the beach. ¬†The children were just running and running. ¬†The huge expanse of dunes, meant total freedom for further than they could have stamina for (a perfect win for parents!). ¬†Once we caught up with them, we headed onto the beach. ¬†Here the sand was so white, soft, and beautiful. ¬†We were there on a windy late April day, but in the summer the sea will be a lot calmer and warmer for swimming in. ¬†Today the children were happy just to chase the waves, and again run, run, run enjoying the freedom. ¬†We didn’t meet another soul along Sandhammeren beach, and could see either way along the beach for miles. ¬†Our little lady seemed to favour playing down on the shore line, enjoying splashing, running in and out of the waves, and writing her name in footprints on the sand. ¬†It wasn’t long before the wellies were discarded in favour of bare feet as the waves had gone in over the top anyway. ¬†Where we used to live in the UK we had a shingle beach, and whilst she was always to be found barefoot (the best way to be), it was always with an uncomfortable hobble. ¬†So, to say she enjoyed sinking her feet into the soft sand is an understatement. ¬†After a long winter of being all wrapped up in hats, coats, gloves, and second pairs of trousers, I think we all felt a sense of freedom with the shedding of the layers!

Meanwhile the mini men seemed to favour the dunes immediately behind us, running up and down them, before finally persuading Dadda to leap off them (he doesn’t need much persuading!!). ¬†They had so much fun going up and down, and in an out of the grasses.

An action shot of Dadda and our little lady jumping off the dunes

We spent a good couple of hours just exploring this gorgeous beach, and shoes and pockets were filled with sand by the end of all the fun.  We headed back towards the car through the heath and scrub on the footpath, meandering our way a bit more chilled out by now.  Once we were back in the car park, the children had a quick obligatory tree climb and play on the rope swing, before climbing back into the car, with a little less energy than they got out of it with!!  We will definitely be returning to Sandhammeren beach during the summer to have some fun in the Swedish summer sun here, as we have totally fallen in love with the place!

Sandhammeren Beach, Skåne, Skane beach, Sweden beaches, white sand, www.mammasschool.co.uk

Two Tiny Hands

Page 1 of 24

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén