IMG_8817Before I launch into what we’ve been up to today, I’ll give you a little update on how things are progressing for our big move.  We have begun selling things off on eBay, like one of our toddler slides (of course there is another identical one in the garden too, but that’s heading back to Grandma’s), Dadda has whisked out the gloss and radiator paint to tidy up the bashings the poor place has taken, and I have begun stockpiling my favourite deodorants, body moisturisers, shampoos, and most importantly children’s ibuprofen!  The big progression though is, having had three removal companies around in the past 2 weeks, we have now chosen one, and also the estate agent has photographed the house and written up the details all ready to go when we say.  Oh, and perhaps rather crucially, the twins new passports arrived today so they can move with us!  So we now feel like it’s getting a bit more real. We tend to deal with house and moving admin everyday as there is so much going on, both here and in Scandinavia, but in the meantime I try and give the children as normal day as possible, with us trying to get out into nature still, and once there spending time in the moment, rather than continuing to fret or write lists.

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So, on today’s agenda was crabbing and skimming stones to try and get those filled out in the National Trust books.  We are very lucky, that a 10 minute hassled bike or scoot from our front door we have a brilliant place (I get a bit fraught as the little lady on her bike, mini man no.1 on his balance bike, mini man no.2 on his scooter, and me on my bike carrying everything plus fishing nets try and cross a main road!).  Our end of the beach (that I have affectionately called our end of the beach) is usually very quiet…no nearby loos, parks, or refreshment places, so apart from a few dog walkers, you’ve generally got it to yourself.  On that part of the beach there is a marvellous outcrop of rocks which are very easy to scramble over with little legs, but give the sense of a huge adventure, especially as they jut quite far out into the sea when the tide is coming in.

z33We arrived on the beach at a great time, with the sea coming in but having only reached 3/4 of the length of the rocks.  This meant they could easily get onto the rocks from a dry beach, and they weren’t submerged yet (you can’t see the rocks at all at high tide).  They are also a fantastic place as you are guaranteed an almost instant catch of some sizeable specimens.  This is very important when doing something like this with 2 four year olds who don’t necessarily have the time to dangle ham into sea water for infinite lengths of time!  On the other hand, our little lady will sit and wait patiently with a net, no bait, and catch the rarest fish in existence.  Today was no different and we caught a few lovely large ones that the children could then see the features very easily on, and examine at their own leisure before we replace them back into the sea.  The stone skimming we did was slightly less successful with only the little lady getting the hang of it, and the boys nearly hitting everyone on the head with rocks during their attempts.  I think that challenge is going to have to sit on the back burner for them for a little while longer.

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We all spent a lovely four hours crabbing and playing on the beach.  There was much imaginative play after the crabbing had finished, mainly involving pirates 🙂

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