Living abroad in Sweden work snow www.mammasschool.co.ukLiving abroad here in Sweden, Dadda’s job has worked out very well too.  Back in the UK there is the practice of people not wanting to be seen leaving before anyone else (regardless of having done their hours), as it seems to be almost a competition of who can work the most (much to his unhappiness)!  Here, no one is staying beyond the end of their hours, and you’d be thought insane to do so!  This makes such a difference to one’s outlook on work, and puts it in its place, and family time first.  They also make sure fika is continued in the work place.  This is a Swedish concept, with no direct English translation, but generally translates taking a break with a coffee, a bun, and a chat.  They actively encourage you to step away from your desk and take a (paid) break.

Then there is the white stuff….lots and lots of white stuff!  Don’t get me wrong, you need to like the cold, the winter, the dark, and wearing warm hats and 2 pairs of trousers for 6 months of the year, and enjoy a good workout digging your car out.  However if you do, this is the place for you.  I was even told tonight, they hadn’t had a proper winter this year!!  Well, we have been very happy with lots of sledging, dozens of snowmen, and hundreds of snowballs thrown!  I can see though, if you are a sunshine, warm weather person, this is definitely not the place for you!  For us though, having four clearly defined seasons is amazing 🙂

Tomorrow I will conclude this little series on how we have found life since living abroad in Sweden.  I will be looking at how the home is the heart of our family, and how Swedish our home and living has become.  Plus I will be considering what happens if we find out it is not for us…….