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Category: Nature Based Learning (Page 1 of 5)

Spring Pond Dipping – Watching Nature Wake Up After Winter

We are back into our Nature Curriculum again now that spring has started to arrive, and nature is finally waking up here in Sweden.  It seemed a nice idea, on such a sunny afternoon, to head down to the pond to do a spot of pond dipping and pond studying.  The weather has been so sunny, less windy, and dryer, so we even took our nature journals with us to do outside while we had our subjects there to study.  Sure enough once we arrived, we could see all the ice had melted, the sun was warming the water nicely, and instantly we could spot frogs swimming around and playing peekaboo on the surface.  My three were really excited.

The frogs were literally suspended in the water, very still, enjoying a good old sunbathe in their pond.  They were so funny, and very easy to see.  They were huge!  We were convinced we may have actually been looking at toads, but then spotted they did in fact have webbed back feet, making it more probable these were in fact frogs (along with a few other pointers).  Our little lady managed to help me catch one to get a closer inspection, and then she headed back to the pond, and came back with a tadpole/nearly frog specimen to examine too.  At this point, having done something that resembled more fishing than pond dipping, all thoughts of pond dipping went out of the window.  My trio had more than enough in these 2 fine specimens to keep them busy for a few hours!  I had hoped to locate some frogspawn, as last year we didn’t manage this either.  I thought as it had only just stopped snowing a week ago, and we still had freezing temperatures until a few days ago, we might have got lucky.  However, the parts of the pond we could access (very dense woodland surrounding it), didn’t give us any sightings of frog spawn.

We retreated a safe distance from the pond, and found a nice clearing to sit in.  No such thing as a nice ready made pond dipping platform here, as nature is left to its own devices so you need to blend in with it to study it!  We got our nature journals out and our pencil cases, and started sketching the two specimens we had found.  We chatted at this point about what they were, whether they were frogs or toads, and the main differences about them.  We also discussed the way they lived and their habitat as well, making notes in our journals as we went along (well, I added it in for the mini men, who will benefit one day!).  It was so lovely to be finally back outside sketching again in the sunshine, even if we were still well wrapped up.

After a while, the children headed off to climb trees while I lit the Kelly Kettle to make a warm drink.  They were going to have a warm drink and marshmallows while we read this week’s book (“By Pond and River” by Arabella Buckley) and this week’s poem (“A Friend in the Garden” by Julia Horatia Ewing).  

Today we had such a lovely time watching nature waking up after the long very cold Swedish winter, and already, just a week on from our last snowfall, nature is already very awake!!  The children loved being able to see such fine specimens so easily, and also were very pleased to catch a couple themselves (all specimens were gently returned afterwards).  They learnt so much this afternoon as the sheer pleasure of the situation was motivating, and the hands on experience will not be easily forgotten, and all to the background music of sea eagles calling to each other all throughout the afternoon 🙂

Spring pond dipping, pond study, frogs, pond life, spring www.mammasschool.co.uk

 

 

The Nature Curriculum we use is, “Exploring Nature with Children. A complete, year-long curriculum”. It is a beautifully written framework, written by Raising Little Shoots, and can be found over at https://raisinglittleshoots.com/ It suggests a topic for the week, and then provides some background information and suggestions for nature journaling and outdoor exploring. It also provides a comprehensive suggested reading list (fiction and non-fiction) for each week, plus a poem and a piece of art to study. There are extensions activity ideas too. We use the topic as the theme for our week, and follow the ideas for our journaling, and one fiction book. What we have been doing from the curriculum can be found on our curriculum overview post. The craft, science, maths, and English ideas we have researched ourselves to fit in with the theme 🙂 This makes a learning a lot more nature based.

 

Country Kids

Nature Curriculum Week 25 – Snails.

Snails nature learning www.mammasschool.co.ukThe month of March in the Nature Curriculum, is a difficult one for us.  Everything is still very much still asleep here in Sweden.  The temperatures are still below freezing, and snow is still falling from the sky.  There are signs that spring is on its way with more daylight hours, and a lot more birdsong, but it takes a lot longer to get going here!  So, I juggled the weeks around, choosing to do snails this week, as I thought we could find some.  Well, I was very wrong!!  I have done a lot of research for extension activities (see my pinterest page https://uk.pinterest.com/mammasschool/nature-curriculum-snails/ ) but we couldn’t do a lot of them without an actual snail!!  So, we have done the theory and a little bit of craft (blog post to come), and we have tried our best!  Luckily all three children remember snail races and other activities we did late last spring back in the UK, so all is not lost!

For our nature journals we sketched a picture from an image on the computer, in the absence of a real model!  We looked at a snail’s anatomy, their habitat, and their diet.  We learnt about how they move and travel, and the best fact was that they had little tongue like organs covered in tiny razor teeth like things to grind their food up!  The children learnt they have no backbone (invertebrates), and belong to the phylum mollusc. They learnt that the large foot the snail has, places them into the gastropod class.  The trio also had a printed off snail diagram to label (the twins and I did it together due to the lack of reading skills, but they enjoyed the process of labelling).

This week’s fiction book is “The Adventurous Snail” by Dick King Smith.  We are enjoying the tale still as it is a longer story and needs to be read in a few sittings.  We also dug out Julia Donaldson’s “The Snail and the Whale” which is a firm favourite for all three of the children.  The poem this week was “Snail” by Langston Hughes.

We have still learnt quite a bit about snails, but we were unfortunately unable to do any practical work with them.  We’ve still had fun though with what we have done 🙂

 

 

The Nature Curriculum we use is, “Exploring Nature with Children. A complete, year-long curriculum”. It is a beautifully written framework, written by Raising Little Shoots, and can be found over at https://raisinglittleshoots.com/ It suggests a topic for the week, and then provides some background information and suggestions for nature journaling and outdoor exploring. It also provides a comprehensive suggested reading list (fiction and non-fiction) for each week, plus a poem and a piece of art to study. There are extensions activity ideas too. We use the topic as the theme for our week, and follow the ideas for our journaling, and one fiction book. What we have been doing from the curriculum can be found on our curriculum overview post. The craft, science, maths, and English ideas we have researched ourselves to fit in with the theme 🙂 This makes a learning a lot more nature based.

Bird Maths and Writing Practice

The mini men have been using bird maths and writing themed ideas for their learning this week.  There are lots more ideas out there (check out my Pinterest board  https://uk.pinterest.com/mammasschool/nature-curriculum-birds/ for more ideas as well as craft ones too!).  Both boys have a limited attention span for more traditional types of learning exercises, so we choose 3 or 4 and don’t do too many repetitions for each one!  It is more about enjoying the learning experience at this stage, and anything they pick up along the way is a real bonus.  Twin 1 is loving his writing practice and thinking about words, and yet gets a bit silly and giddy with his maths.  Whereas twin 2 finds the process of writing very tedious (but still likes reading/looking), and absolutely loves anything to do with numbers, and finds them quite easy too at the moment.  So we have 7 or 8 bird maths and writing practice ideas for you.

Bird maths and writing practise pre school learning sensory nature learning learning creative learning www.mammasschool.co.ukKicking off the bird maths and writing practice ideas are the writing/reading exercises.  My double trouble respond really well to sensory learning.  So, this tray of bird seed with a swan feather to write with, was a perfect attention grabber.  We have heaps of random feathers lying around the house, so it was nice to use one!  I would say a letter, and mix it up with capitals and small ones, and they would have to draw the letter in the tray of bird seed with the feather.  They don’t tire of this kind of exercise so quickly, so we get a little bit more practice done.

One thing we are spending quite a lot of time on at the moment, to assist with their reading, is thinking about the letters that words start with, and then recognising them written down.  I drew some key word pictures (which they did very well to recognise!), and they had to match the picture to the correct word.  So we had egg, bird, nest, wing, and tree.

 

 

We then went on to practise their writing using the key words.  First of all they traced them a few times, before writing them independently.  The boys are working at recognising that each letter comes in 2 forms, big and small.  After they had practised writing the words, we used the first letters of our key theme words to practise writing the letters in their pairs.  This is where mini man no.2 struggles to keep going, where it gets a bit repetitive, but he did persevere.

 

Next up was the maths practice, starting with basic counting and writing numbers without a prompt.  They had to count a line of birds or eggs, and write the quantity that there was in the line, at the end of it.  This task is now very achievable for them in the numbers 1-10, so I now need to start upping the numbers we are using in the next few weeks.  However, it is lovely to see (and very reassuring) I have actually managed to teach my 2 wiggle bums something!

 

The theory behind the next task is trying to help them learn the numbers in word form as well as number form.  I am sticking with 1-10 numbers for a while in this task, as it is really stretching them to spot a number in its word form.  Today we just stuck to English words too.  It again helps with their reading, thinking about the word sounds, so it serves a cheeky dual purpose 🙂

 

 

The final exercise for our bird maths and writing was addition and subtraction, mini man no.2’s favourite.  I had hoped to do this with chocolate eggs as props.  Back in the UK I could have guaranteed that these would have been on sale since December 26th! However, here in Sweden there is not one sign of Easter chocolate yet (which is actually quite nice, not to be seamlessly transitioning from one festivity directly into the next)!  So I had to come up with another bird related idea, less interesting but they never knew about the first idea, so they were OK!  We added and subtracted my badly drawn eggs, but both seemed perfectly content and engaged with the idea!

I hope you liked our ideas. If you did, please visit our Pinterest page for more 🙂

 

Bird Watching Adventure to Almö


Nesting bird watching outdoor play nature play exploring nature www.mammasschool.co.ukOur theme for the week is nesting birds.  With this in mind, our hike this week needed to be in a good spot for some bird watching.  We have a nature reserve on Almö which is not too far.  This is a long strip of land, and about half way down there is a bay with a good view of an island that is a protected bird area.  The perfect place to do some bird watching.  There is a hiking route that runs the length of Almö.  We have hiked the top third, and the bottom third independently, but never the middle third (always been a little too far for little legs, and being a linear walk, we have had to turn around to walk back at about the 2.5km mark).

The map shows the length of Almö, and the red dot (where we were stood at the time) is roughly where we stopped for our bird watching, hot food made in a fire pit, and a lot of play in nature’s playground!  Just below the red dot on the map is the ringed island that is the protected bird area (one of many in the area).  There were a few information boards around as well, that would help us identify anything we saw.  We have been lucky to see sea eagles in the past, there was even one in our garden tree looking very out of place when I returned from school once (there is a lot of wildlife around us, and we do get to see a wide variety very easily), but today, everyone was hiding!  The children did have fun using their binoculars though, even if mini man no.1 was pointing them into the sea rather than at the bird island!

After hiking to the spot, and then bird watching for a while, it was time to enjoy some hot food.  My little lady helped with the food preparation (guarantees it gets eaten with less fuss!), while I lit the fire.

The children then let off a lot of steam climbing trees, clambering over rocks, finding nature made fortresses to play in, and trying to persuade me that we really could take the largest stick ever home in the car.  It always amazes me how little energy they sometimes have whilst actually walking, and then when we stop, they have enough energy to climb Mount Everest! We stayed put for about an hour, just letting them immerse themselves in nature and their own imaginary and creative outdoor play – the best type there is!!

Much fun was had by all, lots of energy was burnt off, and our bellies were full!  The only hiccup was that we didn’t manage to locate the only geocache in the area (a nano one), but that’s to try again another day 🙂

nesting bird watching outdoor play nature play exploring nature www.mammasschool.co.uk

Country Kids
#livinglifewild

Nature Curriculum Week 24 – Nesting Birds

Nature Curriculum week 24 - Nesting Birds bird watching journaling www.mammasschool.co.ukThis week’s topic has been nesting birds.  We have watched for them in the garden, we have done craft on the theme, we have learnt about them and their habitat, we have based our maths and reading learning on nesting birds, and today we rounded off the subject with our journals, poems, and a story.

 

 

 

All week the children have been watching the garden for signs of nesting birds.  I printed off 3 sets of spotter sheets from the RSPB.  You can get these by following this link :  http://www.rspb.org.uk I found them under the RSPB’s Big Schools Birdwatch.  As our garden birds are very similar here in Sweden, I thought these would be great.  I attached them to cardboard (3 sets for 3 children), and then stapled string with a pen on the end to it.  They have stayed all week by the window with their binoculars on top, so the children could come and go as they pleased and look out for nesting birds.  They are really enjoyed this activity.  A lot of birds have been seen and noted, but I’m not sure any evidence of nesting was sighted!  We have now stuck the sheets into their nature journals, which they can refer to at anytime for reference in the future.  Another activity from the RSPB that we did, and put in the journal, was labelling a bird.  We have done a fair bit of bird sketching in our journals before, so this week I made it a little easier for them!!

We did not have any of the recommended stories for the week, so instead we dug out an old book from my childhood, called “The Tale of Tommy Nobody” which is a very cute story. It starts with birds nesting, and continues with the little bird Tommy trying to work out who/what he is.  He meets several types of bird, and I love the way they highlight how each one of these common garden birds is unique.  The suggested poem was “The Brown Thrush” by Lucy Larcom which we enjoyed, but we also dipped back into our “Around the Year” book of poems to read the “March” one.  The art we enjoyed was “Still Life With Three Birds’ Nests” by Van Gogh.

As usual we have had a lot of fun with the theme for the week, although I think it’s still a little cold here at the moment for nesting (snow melted 2 days ago!).  However, on my walk this morning there was definitely a lot more bird singing going on (accompanied by a very persistent woodpecker), so there are definite signs that spring is emerging even here in Sweden 🙂

 

 

The Nature Curriculum we use is, “Exploring Nature with Children. A complete, year-long curriculum”. It is a beautifully written framework, written by Raising Little Shoots, and can be found over at https://raisinglittleshoots.com/ It suggests a topic for the week, and then provides some background information and suggestions for nature journaling and outdoor exploring. It also provides a comprehensive suggested reading list (fiction and non-fiction) for each week, plus a poem and a piece of art to study. There are extensions activity ideas too. We use the topic as the theme for our week, and follow the ideas for our journaling, and one fiction book. What we have been doing from the curriculum can be found on our curriculum overview post. The craft, science, maths, and English ideas we have researched ourselves to fit in with the theme 🙂 This makes a learning a lot more nature based.

Nature Curriculum – Week 22 Evergreens

Evergreens nature journaling story poem www.mammasschool.co.ukThis week’s Nature Curriculum topic is evergreens.  This is a much better topic for us to study in the snow than earthworms!  In other posts I have discussed how we have done extension activities on the theme of evergreens.  We went for a snowy hike to collect supplies, we have been crafting, and we have done experiments.  This week, due to being out and about in the snow so much, we have just stuck with our workbooks for our maths and English 🙂

 

 

For our nature journal, we sketched three types of evergreen samples that we had collected.  The weather is still far too cold for us to do our sketching out on our walks, so we are bringing the samples home to draw.  After we’d drawn the different types that we’d collected, we tried to classify them and write that in.  We also wrote some key evergreen facts into our journals along side the drawings.  Something else that we added was an ivy leaf rubbing.  Ivy is also evergreen, and leaf rubbing is an easy, popular, and very effective activity with the trio.

Our recommended fiction read for the week was something I seem to have got in a muddle about, and I found a book in the draw differing from the suggested book.  So we read “Night Tree” by Eve Bunting.  We really enjoyed this story and it has given us a great idea to do next Christmas.  It’s about a family that goes on an adventure into the woods just before Christmas.  They take with them, home made bird seed balls, satsumas, apples, and popcorn string.  There they find “their tree” and decorate it under the moonlight with the food.  After a warm drink they then return home, leaving the tree goodies as a Christmas feast for the forest animals.  There is ample opportunity for us to that here, so I am going to try and remember about it.  The suggested poem for the evergreen topic was “The Fir-Tree” by Josephine Preston Peabody, and the piece of art, “Fir Trees At Sunset” by Arnold Böcklin.

It has been a really lovely topic for us to study, especially because of where we are living and what surrounds us 🙂

 

The Nature Curriculum we use is, “Exploring Nature with Children. A complete, year-long curriculum”. It is a beautifully written framework, written by Raising Little Shoots, and can be found over at https://raisinglittleshoots.com/ It suggests a topic for the week, and then provides some background information and suggestions for nature journaling and outdoor exploring. It also provides a comprehensive suggested reading list (fiction and non-fiction) for each week, plus a poem and a piece of art to study. There are extensions activity ideas too. We use the topic as the theme for our week, and follow the ideas for our journaling, and one fiction book. What we have been doing from the curriculum can be found on our curriculum overview post. The craft, science, maths, and English ideas we have researched ourselves to fit in with the theme 🙂 This makes a learning a lot more nature based.

Nature Curriculum Week 21 – Earthworms

Earthworms nature journaling story exploring nature www.mammasschool.co.ukThe topic of earthworms has been quite a challenge for us this week.  They are snug little mini beasties hiding deep in the soil under a couple of feet of snow!  However, we have managed to dig a few out to be able to study them in real life 🙂  We have done some earthworm craft, some earthworm maths, some earthworm science, and lastly we did our nature journal and read the suggested story, poem, and chatted about the piece of art.

 

After a lot of removing snow, and digging around in a flower bed, I managed to come across the helpful little earthworms that would assist us in our studying!  After examining them, we attempted to sketch the earthworms into our nature journals.  We labelled their basic structure, and then we researched some fun facts about them.  I think our little lady was most taken by the fun fact that in amongst the colours earthworms could be, bright blue was an option!  We wrote about what they liked and didn’t like to eat.  Finally we finished our earthworm journal with how they help things grow and enrich the soil with more nutrients.

I love this part of the week where we snuggle up for afternoon stories.  Extra ones added into the day on top of bedtime stories 🙂  One of this week’s suggested reads was “The Diary of a Worm” by Doreen Cronin.  This is a very cute tale, but has facts weaved through it about the life of an earthworm.  We added on one from our own bookcase, the very popular “Superworm” by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler.  The poem we read was “The Worm” by Ralph Bergengren.

My three have enjoyed getting hands on with the earthworms in this topic.  They have learnt a lot about why we need earthworms.  Learning along the way that earthworms are very important to the environment.

 

The Nature Curriculum we use is, “Exploring Nature with Children. A complete, year-long curriculum”. It is a beautifully written framework, written by Raising Little Shoots, and can be found over at https://raisinglittleshoots.com/ It suggests a topic for the week, and then provides some background information and suggestions for nature journaling and outdoor exploring. It also provides a comprehensive suggested reading list (fiction and non-fiction) for each week, plus a poem and a piece of art to study. There are extensions activity ideas too. We use the topic as the theme for our week, and follow the ideas for our journaling, and one fiction book. What we have been doing from the curriculum can be found on our curriculum overview post. The craft, science, maths, and English ideas we have researched ourselves to fit in with the theme 🙂 This makes a learning a lot more nature based.

Wriggly, Squirmy, Earthworm Maths!

Wriggly Squiggly earthworm maths exploring nature fun maths www.mammasschool.co.ukEarthworms are our Nature Curriculum theme for the week, so we got creative with our maths 🙂  My boys love changing the way we do our maths every week.  It renews their interest, and both of them are showing progress now.  We still work with some of the same concepts, but every week we try and have a go at something new too.  This week our new maths concepts were measuring and starting to recognise written number words.

 

 

First up was a maths sorting exercise.  The mini men had “worms” of differing lengths, and had to sort them from shortest to longest.  This type of sorting task they seem to now have a good grasp of.

 

 

I then introduced measuring maths to them.  They have been measuring them by eye, e.g. shortest to longest, but not at using a ruler to measure.  This not only introduced them to using a ruler, but it also introduced units of measurements.  I do not expect them to remember we were using centimetres, but they will remember there was a way to measure the worms, and the ruler gives you that measurement.  I also think they will remember how to use the ruler (matching the item being measured to the end, and then reading the number at the other end).  They loved this task.  They felt very grown up, like their big sister, using the ruler.

One of the concepts we keep practising is addition and subtraction in one form or another.  This week we were using the number cards to make the sum.  The mini men then added/took away blobs of play-doh to/from a cardboard worm. I get them to read the sum out loud, and they add the blobs as they go along.  They realise that whatever is left on the worm is the answer.  They are finally getting the hang of these basic sums, and it is lovely to know (with a little bit of satisfaction) I have managed to teach them something!!  My 2 men are not one for workbooks as they find them too repetitive.  We use them once a week to guide us (me!!), and then the rest is working out more interactive ways of doing our learning that will keep them motivated and enthusiastic!  The method seems to be working too.

A second new concept I introduced today was starting to get them to read the word version of a number, and place the right amount of worms by that word.  This is the sort of task I have now started doing in both English and Swedish.  They need to start recognising speech and written words in both languages.  It is easier for me to read etc to them in English (as my Swedish is progressing very slowly!).  However, when I can, I do try and introduce whatever I am trying to teach them, in both languages!

I hope you can enjoy some of our earthworm maths ideas with your little people 🙂

 

 

Candle Maths.

Candle maths maths fun with candles play based learning www.mammasschool.co.ukToday it was maths with candles 🙂 Our little lady had a friend home from school, so obviously we needed a cake of some sort…not to be eaten though, until we were done with sticking candles in it for maths!!  I could have drawn candles and cakes to use, but this was a more tasty and fun way of doing our maths.

 

 

First task for the boys was to play a game.  They sat either side of the coffee table with number cards face down, and the cake and candles in the middle.  They would choose a card, turn it over and then put the right amount of candles into the cake.  They had to count out loud too, first in English then in Swedish.  So, they were learning number recognition and counting (usually fine in English but helps with their understanding in Swedish to do it in both languages).

For the next task, the number cards were face down on the table again.  We had either a plus/minus sign and the equals sign, with space for two numbers to make up the sum.  After the equals sign there was a play-doh  “birthday cake” that needed candles added.  The boys filled the spaces in for the sum, and then read them out loud and did the required maths by either putting candles into or taking them away from the cake 🙂  Both had a lot of fun doing this, and we managed to do a lot more sums than we usually manage before it gets too tedious for them.

The third task was about number recognition again.  I placed some candles into the “birthday cake”, and then they had to choose the card with the right number on it to match the number of candles.

I know it probably seems rather repetitive to do another number recognition exercise, but we are working hard on recognising our teen numbers, and by changing the nature of the task, they are none the wiser that they are still doing the same thing 🙂  Here they had to put the right amount of tealights into the line according to the number on the paper.

They really enjoyed their maths this afternoon, so I hope there is an idea there, that your little person would enjoy too 🙂

If you want to hear more ideas from us, make sure you sign up to have the new blog posts sent to your email 🙂

 

Nature Curriculum Week 20 – Candlemas

This week the theme in the nature curriculum was Candlemas.  So what is it?  It is the mid point of winter, half way between the shortest day of the year and the spring equinox.  It is also a Christian festival. We have not only been studying this, but then using the candle theme to base our maths, crafts, and science work on 🙂  So spring (in theory) is on its way.  As we have walked around our frozen island, we have been vigilant looking out for signs of spring emerging, even though we still feel very wintry.  We have found buds on the bushes, spring bulbs we planted back in October are now pushing through the earth, and we most definitely have the light of the day for longer, which makes everything a little easier.  We are now also walking to school again in the morning in the daylight!

There were lots of suggestions of ideas for journaling this week in the curriculum, but we decided to write a poem and compliment it with springlike drawings.  The poem’s title was Candlemas, and so our little lady needed to come up with a few lines about the seeing out of winter, and the looking forward to spring.  I think she did really well (writing poems is something she doesn’t find easy, so then doesn’t like trying to do it, but she’s now done a few recently, and very well too, so I am hoping her anxiety about them is diminishing a little).

Our suggested story for the week was Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Snowdrop” which we enjoyed.  However, we also revisited last week’s book as well as we hadn’t finished it.  This week we read a chapter on dragonflies and we all learnt a lot about these beautiful insects.  We learnt that he crawls up a plant stem as a grub, until he is out of the water and in the air.  The skin on his back then cracks and out emerges the dragon fly.  His wings are stretched out in the sunshine for a few hours to harden, at which point he can fly.  We are going to see if we can spot this happening come April/May time at our pond 🙂  We also learnt a really fascinating fact about the whirligig beetle (I love that name!!).  His eyes are divided.  One half looks up into the air, the other half looks down into the water.  The trio then spent 5 minutes trying to look up and down at the same time!!  The suggested piece of art for the week was “Candlemas Day” by Marianne Stokes and our poem for the week was the traditional Candlemas weather proverb:

“If Candlemas Day be fair and bright

Winter will have another fight.

If Candlemas Day brings cloud and rain,

Winter will not come again.”

We have had a lot of fun with this week with the curriculum again, and I hope we have given you some ideas to try as well.

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The Nature Curriculum we use is, “Exploring Nature with Children. A complete, year-long curriculum”. It is a beautifully written framework, written by Raising Little Shoots, and can be found over at https://raisinglittleshoots.com/ It suggests a topic for the week, and then provides some background information and suggestions for nature journaling and outdoor exploring. It also provides a comprehensive suggested reading list (fiction and non-fiction) for each week, plus a poem and a piece of art to study. There are extension activity ideas too. We use the topic as the theme for our week, and follow the ideas for our journaling, and one fiction book. What we have been doing from the curriculum can be found on our curriculum overview post. The craft, science, maths, and English ideas we have researched ourselves to fit in with the theme 🙂 This makes our learning a lot more nature based.

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